List of Proposals

By Year Proposed

 


 

2015-2016: The Senate proposals

1. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to specifically provide that each person has a right to privacy, including the right to keep personal information private; to communicate with others privately; and to make decisions concerning his or her body. (Sent to Senate Committee on Judiciary January 15, 2015; rejected by the Senate April 21, 2016.)

2. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide that if a candidate for the office of Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, or Treasurer does not receive the required majority vote in the general election, then instead of the General Assembly electing that officer, a runoff election between the two candidates receiving the greatest number of votes cast shall be held on the first Tuesday in December to determine the winner. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 15, 2015; never emerged.)

3. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide for the election of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Treasurer by plurality vote, provided that the candidate receives at least 45 percent of the votes cast.  If no candidate receives at least 45 percent of the votes, then a runoff election between the two candidates receiving the greatest number of votes cast shall be held on the first Tuesday in December to determine the winner. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 22, 2015; never emerged.)

4. This constitutional amendment would: (1) require reapportionment of legislative districts to be performed by an appointed public body named the Legislative Apportionment Board, rather than by the General Assembly; and (2) limit senatorial districts to a maximum of three Senators, beginning with the first reapportionment performed by the Legislative Apportionment Board. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations February 5, 2015; never emerged.)

5. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide for election of the: (1) Governor by the greatest number of votes, except that if no candidate for Governor receives at least 45 percent of the votes cast and there is less than a two percent margin between the candidate who received the greatest number of votes and the second-place finisher, then a runoff election between those two candidates shall be held on the first Tuesday in December to determine the winner; and (2) Lieutenant-Governor and Treasurer by the greatest number of votes. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations February 6, 2015; never emerged.)

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2011-2012: The Senate considered five proposals

1. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide a right to health care. The general assembly shall determine the scope of the right to health care. (Sent to Senate Committee on Health and Welfare January 25, 2011; never emerged.)

2. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide a set of environmental rights, including clean water, a natural environment uncompromised by manufactured substances that are toxic and unhealthy, and enjoyment of nature, forests, wilderness, and wildlife. (Sent to Senate Committee on Natural Resources and Energy January 25, 2011; never emerged.)

3. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide that the term of office for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, Auditor of Accounts, High Bailiffs, and Justices of the Peace be four years, and that the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and Treasurer be elected by plurality vote, beginning with the term commencing after the general election in November 2016. (Sent to Senate Government Operations February 11, 2011; never emerged.)

4. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to specifically provide that each person has a right to privacy, including the right to keep personal information private; to communicate with others privately; and to make decisions concerning his or her body. (Sent to Senate Judiciary January 3, 2012; never emerged.)

5. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide for election of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Treasurer by plurality vote, provided the candidate receive at least 40 percent of the votes cast. If no candidate receives at least 40 percent of the votes, then a runoff election between the two candidates receiving the greatest number of votes cast shall be held on the first Tuesday in December to determine the winner. (Sent to Senate Government Operations January 3, 2012; never emerged.)

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2007-2008: The Senate considered six proposals

1. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide for an organizational session of the Vermont General Assembly on the first Wednesday in December following each general election for the exclusive purposes of organization, swearing in of members, and selection of officers (sent to Senate Government Operations January 19, 2007; recommitted to Senate Government Operations April 17, 2008; never emerged).

2. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide that the term of office for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, Auditor of Accounts, and Attorney General be four years, beginning with the term commencing after the general election in November 2012 (sent to Senate Government Operations January 19, 2007; never emerged).

3. This proposal would amend the Vermont Constitution to allow cities, towns, and villages to adopt, amend, or repeal their respective charters and to provide cities, towns, and villages with all powers and authority to perform all functions their voters determine their respective municipalities need (sent to Senate Government Operations February 21, 2007; never emerged).

4. This proposal would amend the Vermont Constitution to provide that the term of office for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, Auditor of Accounts, Attorney General, State Senators, and State Representatives be four years, beginning with the term commencing after the general election in November 2012 (sent to Senate Government Operations April 5, 2007; never emerged).

5. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the State of Vermont to provide that a person who will attain the age of 18 by the date of the general election shall have the right to vote in the primary election (adopted as Article 54 by the electorate on November 2, 2010).

6. This proposal would amend the Constitution of the state of Vermont to allow the General Assembly to establish requirements for the election of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, and Auditor of Accounts (sent to Senate Government Operations January 23, 2008; never emerged).

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2003-2004: The Senate considered seven proposals

1. Providing for election of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Treasurer by plurality vote, provided the candidate receive at least 40 percent of the votes cast.  If no candidate receives at least 40 percent of the votes, then a runoff election between the two candidates receiving the greatest number of votes cast shall be held on the first Tuesday in December to determine the winner. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 28, 2003, never emerged.)

2. Allowing the General Assembly to establish requirements for the election of Governor, Lieutenant‑Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, and Auditor of Accounts. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 29, 2003, never emerged.)

3. A declaration of the rights of the inhabitants of the State of Vermont; Same-sex marriage prohibited. (Sent to Senate Committee on Judiciary February 20, 2003, never emerged.)

4. Providing that the term of office for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, Auditor of Accounts, and Attorney General be four years, beginning with the term commencing after the general election in November 2010. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations March 28, 2003, never emerged.)

5. Affirms the equality and necessity of both genders in marriage and society. (Sent to Senate Committee on Judiciary January 6, 2004, never emerged.)

6. Adds Sec. 77 to Chapter II of the Constitution relating to taxation and voter referendum. (Sent to Senate Committee on Finance January 6, 2004, never emerged.)

7. Providing for the adoption, alteration, or amendment of municipal charters by a city, town, or village by approval of a majority of the municipality's voters. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 6, 2004, never emerged.)

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1999: The Senate considered seven proposals

1. Providing that the terms for Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, Auditor of Accounts and High Bailiffs be four years, beginning with the term commencing after the general election in November 2006. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 12, 1999, never emerged.)

2. Providing for the election of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Treasurer by plurality vote. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations January 21, 1999, never emerged.)

3. Providing for staggered terms for justices of the Supreme Court and judges of subordinate courts. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations February 4, 1999; passed the Senate, request concurrence of House (26-1), March 26, 1999; referred to House Committee on Judiciary March 31, 1999, never emerged.)

4. Elimination of mandatory retirement provision for justices of the Supreme Court and judges of all subordinate courts. (Adopted as Article 53 by the electorate,  November 5, 2002.)

5. Establishing health care as a right of citizenship and obligating the state to protect this right. (Referred to Senate Committee on Health & Welfare January 11, 2000; never emerged.)

6. Clarifying the definition of marriage. (Referred to Senate Committee on Judiciary January 28, 2000; rejected by Senate April 18, 2000.)

7. Permitting proposals of amendment to the Constitution to be initiated during the first year of any biennial session of the General Assembly, and to require passage in the Senate in the first biennium by a majority vote. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations March 21, 2000; never emerged.)

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1995: The Senate considered thirteen proposals

1. Providing for the authorization of direct initiatives for the enactment of legislation by petition of 25% of the voters casting ballots in the preceding gubernatorial election. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 10, 1995; never emerged.)

2. Providing for an early organizational session of the General Assembly in December held exclusively for the swearing in of members and selection of officers. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 17, 1995; passed the Senate (29-0), April 17, 1995; referred to House Committee on Government Operations, April 17, 1995; never emerged.)

3. Providing for the removal of the four-year time lock on proposals to amend the Vermont Constitution; would allow amendments to be proposed in any biennial session. (Adopted by Senate (21-9) February 14, 1995 Read and referred to House Judiciary February 16, 1995; never emerged.)

4. Providing term limits for the election of senators and representatives to not more than six consecutive terms (12 years). (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations February 8, 1995; never emerged.)

5. Authorizing the formation of a unicameral legislature comprised of fifty members for the State of Vermont. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, February 14, 1995; never emerged.)

6. Providing for a deadline date for adjournment of not later than April 30 for any legislative session of the General Assembly. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, February 15, 1995; never emerged.)

7. Providing for a fair and equal education for all of the children of the state, regardless of their place of residence within the state. (Sent to Senate Committee on Education, February 22, 1995; reported favorably by Education, April 17, 1996; sent to Senate Committee on Judiciary, April 24, 1996; never emerged.)

8. Providing that the terms for state officers shall be for four years and limited to three consecutive terms each. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations March 10, 1995; passed Senate (21-9) March 29, 1996; sent to House Committee on Government Operations, April 1, 1996; never emerged.)

9. Establishing term limits for the Justices of the Supreme Court and all other judges (except for probate and assistant judges) of not more than two six-year terms (12 years) on the same court. (These terms can be either consecutive or separated by a time interval.) (Sent to Senate Committee on Judiciary January 3, 1996; never emerged.)

10. Reduces the size of the Senate from thirty (30) to twenty-five (25) members, reduces the size of the House of Representatives from one hundred fifty (150) members to seventy-five (75) members, establishes four-year terms of office for members of the General Assembly, and provides for annual (instead of biennial) sessions of the General Assembly. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 3, 1996; never emerged.)

11. Allows the Voter’s Oath to be self-administered and removes the requirement that the Voter’s Oath be administered by a notary public. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 3, 1996; passed Senate (28-1), April 4, 1996; sent to House Committee on Local Government, April 5, 1996; adopted by House, April 11, 1996.) Note: from 1997 Senate Journal: "The passage of S.189 (the "motor-voter" registration law) in 1997 vitiates the necessity of proceeding further with this proposal." S.189 became Act #47, Laws of 1997.

12. Mandates six-person juries for civil trials. (Sent to Senate Committee on Judiciary, January 5, 1996; never emerged.)

13. Provides that the total amount of appropriations authorized to meet general budget expenditures for any fiscal year shall not exceed the estimated total of revenue for such fiscal year, except for emergencies declared by the Governor. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, April 3, 1996; never emerged.)

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1991: The Senate considered twenty-one proposals

1. Providing for state funding and reimbursement to local political subdivisions for any mandated state programs. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 15, 1991; never emerged.)

2. Restriction of bail for criminal offenses under certain circumstances to ensure that the interests and safety of the public are protected. (Sent to Senate Judiciary Committee, January 15, 1991; never emerged.)

3. Authorizing direct initiatives to be originated by the voting public. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 15, 1991; never emerged.)

4. Providing that no person may be elected to the House of Representatives or to the Senate for more than six (6) consecutive terms. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 15, 1991; never emerged.)

5. Providing that the terms for state officers be for four (4) years. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 15, 1991; passed the Senate March 19, 1991; referred to the House Committee on Government Operations, March 21, 1991; never emerged.)

6. Providing the Governor with the authority to veto line appropriation items. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 15, 1991; never emerged.)

7. Restriction of bail for criminal offenses under certain circumstances to ensure that the interests and safety of the public are protected. (Adopted as Article 51 by the electorate, November 8, 1994.)

8. Providing for the election of statewide officers by a plurality vote (rather than by a majority). (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, January 25, 1991; never emerged.)

9. Providing for the right of privacy. (Sent to Senate Judiciary Committee, January 30, 1991; never emerged.)

10. Providing for a deadline date for adjournment of no later than April 30 for any legislative session. (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, February 8, 1991; never emerged.)

11. Providing for the utilization of gender inclusive (or neutral) language in Chapters I and II of the Vermont Constitution. (Adopted as Article 52 by the electorate, November 8, 1994.)

12. Allowing amendments to the Vermont Constitution to be proposed in any biennial session (every 2 years). (Sent to Senate Committee on Government Operations, February 22, 1991; never emerged.)

13. Providing for a thorough and equitable system of free public education, affording equal opportunities of each child. (Sent to Senate Education Committee, March 1, 1991; never emerged.)

14. Private property subject to public use; owner to be paid. (Sent to Senate Judiciary Committee January 7, 1992; never emerged.)

15. Providing for funding of retirement systems. (Sent to Senate Education Committee January 7, 1992; never emerged.)

16. To abolish the office of Lieutenant-Governor. (Sent to Senate Government Operations Committee January 7, 1992; never emerged.)

17. Providing for method of filling vacancy in office of Governor, Lieutenant-Governor and Treasurer. (Sent to Senate Government Operations Committee January 14, 1992; never emerged.)

18. Providing for a direct initiative by the voters. (Sent to Senate Government Operations Committee January 15, 1992; never emerged.)

19. Providing for trials by jury and number of jurors. (Sent to Senate Judiciary Committee January 16, 1992; sent to Senate Government Operations Committee February 20, 1992; recommitted to Senate Judiciary Committee February 25, 1992; never emerged.)

20. Providing for the filling of vacancies in the office of Governor. (Sent to Senate Government Operations Committee January 16, 1992; never emerged.)

21. Providing for the filling of vacancies on the death or resignation of Governor and Lieutenant Governor. (Sent to Senate Government Operations Committee February 16, 1992; passed the Senate February 27, 1992; referred to the House Committee on Government Operations March 4, 1992; never emerged.)

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1987: The Senate considered six proposals

1. That the people have a right of privacy, which is essential to their freedom and shall be preserved. (Sent to Judiciary Committee, January 13, 1987; never emerged.)

2. Establishes four year terms for Governor, Lieutenant-governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, Auditor of Accounts, Attorney General, Assistant Judges, Sheriffs, State's Attorneys, and Judges of Probate.  Authorizes legislature to consider certificates of votes, rather than ballots.  Makes Attorney General a constitutional officer. (Rejected by the Senate, January 26, 1988.)

3. Establishes municipal home rule, authorizing the legislature to grant a charter of incorporation but prohibiting the legislature from amending any.  "Amendment of a municipal charter shall be the sole right of the voters of the municipality charter shall be the sole right of the voters of the municipality except that the General Assembly may, by special law, repeal a charter amendment enacted by the voters." (Sent to Senate Government Operations Committee, January 8, 1988; never emerged.)

4. Amends the section on mandatory retirement of judges to eliminate the mandate and clarifies retirement to include the failure to file notice of a desire to continue in office. (Sent to Judiciary Committee, February 4, 1988; never emerged.)

5. Provides for plurality to elect Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, and Auditor of Accounts, a special run-off election if no candidate receives at least forty percent of the popular votes, and legislative canvassing of certificates of votes rather than ballots. (Passes the Senate; referred to House Government Operations Committee, March 8, 1988; never emerged.)

6. Provides for the payment of fair compensation to owners of private property when the value of their property is reduced significantly as a result of governmental regulations or restrictions. (Sent to Senate Judiciary Committee, February 2, 1988; never emerged.)

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1983: The Senate considered ten proposals

1. Provides that, "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the State of Vermont or any of its political subdivisions on account of the sex of the individual." (Rejected by the electorate, November 4, 1986.)

2. Repeals Section 35 on mandatory retirement of judges at age 70. (Passed Senate; sent to House Judiciary Committee, March 9, 1984; never emerged.)

3. Providing for staggered terms for Assistant Judges. (Senate Government Operations Committee relieved of proposal; referred to Senate Judiciary Committee, February 1, 1984; never emerged.)

4. Providing for equality of rights regardless of race, creed, religion, sex or national origin. (Referred to Senate Judiciary Committee, January 19, 1983; never emerged.)

5. Providing for four-year terms for all state officers and members of the General Assembly, and designating the Attorney General as a constitutional officer. (Referred to Senate Government Operations Committee, January 19, 1983; never emerged.)

6. Providing for the election of Governor and Lieutenant-Governor jointly on the same ballot.  (Referred to Senate Government Operations Committee, January 25, 1983; never emerged).

7. Providing for reapportionment of the House of Representatives and the Senate following each federal decennial census. (Adopted as Article 50 by the electorate, November 6, 1986.)

8. Providing for administrative control by the Supreme Court over attorneys-at-law as well as judicial officers. (Referred to Senate Judiciary Committee, February 25, 1983; never emerged.)

9. Providing for four-year term for all state officers, and designating the Attorney General as a constitutional officer. (Referred to Senate Judiciary Committee, April 22, 1983; never emerged.)

10. Imposition of bail for criminal offenses; conditions for release for the protection of the public. (Defeated by Senate, March 30, 1984.)

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1979: The Senate considered eight proposals

1. (Proposal A): Establishes four year terms for Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Treasurer, Secretary of State, and Auditor of Accounts. (Rejected by Senate, April 14, 1980.)

2. (Proposal B): Removes inconsistent provisions in Constitution relating to the election and terms of various county officers. (Senate rejected it in second biennium, March 26, 1981.)

3. (Proposal D): Provides for the election of state officers by plurality vote with special election as run-off for the two candidates having the largest number of votes if no candidate receives at least forty percent. (Rejected by Senate, April 14, 1980.)

4. (Proposal E): Authorizes the Speaker of the House and the President Pro Tem of the Senate, with the consent of three-quarters of the members of each chamber, to call a special session of the General Assembly. (Rejected by Senate, April 14, 1980.)

5. (Proposal F): Authorizes legislature to adopt qualifications and election details for state's attorney. (Passed Senate; House referred to House Government Operations Committee, March 31, 1981; never emerged.)

6. (Proposal G): Allows the use of six-man juries in certain jury trials. (Rejected by Senate, April 14, 1980.)

7. (Proposal H): Imposition of bail for criminal offenses. (Adopted as Article 49 by the electorate, March 2, 1982.)

8. (Proposal J): Clarifies Section 43 (inconsistent with later amendments) on election of state and county officers and their terms. (House refuses to concur, April 22, 1980.)

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1975: The Senate considered five proposals

1. Election of state officers by plurality vote. (Rejected by Senate, March 19, 1976.)

2. Compensation for the taking of private property, "whether by condemnation or by other legal process depriving the owner thereof of his reasonable expectation for its use or exchange." (Rejected by Senate, March 18, 1976.)

3. Special elections for offices for which no majority vote is available; canvassing of state candidates by certificate of votes, not ballots; four year terms for state officers. (Passed Senate; referred to House Judiciary Committee, March 19, 1976; never emerged.)

4. Biennial terms for all state and county officers. (Referred to Senate Judiciary, March 15, 1976; never emerged.)

5. Authorizes initiative and referendum, by petition signed by ten percent of the number of votes for Governor in the last gubernatorial election. (Rejected by Senate, March 19, 1976.)

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1971: The Senate considered ten proposals

1. Makes the Attorney General a constitutional officer.  Changes two-year terms for constitutional officers to four-year terms. Modernizes the canvassing of votes for constitutional officers, and provides for a run-off election in the event no candidate receives a majority of the votes. Authorizes the Supreme Court to incorporate, rearrange and renumber amended sections into the present constitution. Eliminates the office of Secretary of Civil and Military Affairs. (Rejected by the people, March 4, 1974.)

2. Requires a special election for Governor or any other state officer when no candidate has received a majority vote in the General Election between the two candidates with the largest number of votes, in lieu of legislative election. Makes the Attorney General a constitutional officer.  Makes the Auditor of Accounts a four year term elected by the General Assembly (later eliminated by amendment of the proposal). Clarifies Section 22 to ensure that all commissions are attested by the Secretary of State. (After Senate proposal, returned to custody of Senate from the House and recommitted March 10, 1971 to the Judiciary Committee, from which it never emerged.)

3. Changes the time-lock for amending the constitution from ten years to four years. (Became Article 45 of the Amendments.)

4. Relates to allocation of highway funds. (Pending reading, committed to the Committee on Highway Traffic, February 9, 1971.)

5. Removes specific reference to creation of courts of chancery; provides for a unified judicial system composed of a Supreme Court, a Superior Court, and such other subordinate courts as the Legislature may establish; removes requirement of maintaining courts in every county; provides that all courts except the Supreme Court may be divided into  geographical and functional divisions as provided by law or by judicial rules adopted by the Supreme Court not inconsistent with law; grants to Supreme Court administrative control over all courts and disciplinary control over all judges and attorneys in the State; vests rulemaking authority in the Supreme Court subject to revision by the Legislature; provides for six year terms of office for Justice of the Supreme Court and Superior Judges; provides for a judicial nominating body for selection of nominees to fill judicial vacancies except for Assistant Judges and Probate Judges; empowers the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate, to fill judicial vacancies; provides for retention in office at end of their terms of Justices of the Supreme Court and Superior Judges by vote of the Legislature; requires mandatory retirement of Justices of the Supreme Court and Superior Judges at end of calendar year in which they attain 70 years of age or at the end of the term of election during which they attain 70 years of age; provides that the manner and certification of elections and filling of vacancies in the offices of the Assistant Judges, Sheriffs, State's Attorneys, Judges of Probate, and Justices of the Peace shall be as establish by law; provides for four-year terms of office for Assistant Judges, Sheriffs, State's Attorneys and Probate Judges; prohibits the exercise of judicial powers by Justices of the Peace; eliminates the High Bailiff as a constitutional officer; does away with the prohibition against waiver of trials by jury by one accused of a felony. (Became Article 46 of the Amendments.)

6. Establishes a House of Representatives of not more than one hundred and fifty members, apportioned by districts. Establishes a Senate of not more than thirty Senators, apportioned by senatorial districts. Authorizes creation of a legislative apportionment board and requires reapportionment every ten years. Makes Senator's terms four years. (Senate proposes; House begins consideration; Senate requests its return, March 29, 1972.)

7. Privileges of freeman granted to 18-year-olds in conformity with present law. Eliminates one year residency requirement which the courts have declared unconstitutional. (Became Article 47 of the Amendments.)

8. Similar to Proposal 6, except reapportionment ordered following each second presidential election. (Proposed by Senate, concurred in by the House in 1972, but no action in succeeding legislative session.) See proposal 10.

9. Authorizes the legislature to provide for the preferential assessment of open and agricultural land or either for property tax purposes. (Senate proposes, March 24, 1972; House never votes on it.)

10. Similar to Proposal 8, except House is made one hundred and fifty members, Senate thirty members, rather than a variable number.  Eliminates age requirement of thirty years for Senators, also all references to form of election, certification, and filling of vacancies, leaving that to general law. Reapportionment ordered following every second presidential election.  (Became Article 48 of the Amendments.)

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1961: The Senate considered eight amendments

1. Amends Chapter II, Section 39, providing for counting of state officer ballots by board of civil authority rather than a general assembly canvassing committee. (Concurrence by House refused July 28, 1961.)

2. Amends Chapter II, Section 45, providing for election of state's attorneys by counties or districts. (Concurrence of House refused July 26, 1961.)

3. Amends Chapter II, Section 64, providing for general assembly to permit maintenance of schools in each town or to make other arrangements. (Became Article 44 of the Amendments.)

4. Amends Chapter II, Section 18, providing for reapportionment of Senate. (Concurrence of House refused, July 26, 1961.)

5. Amends Chapter II, Section 13, providing for reapportionment of House of Representatives. (Concurrence refused by House, July 27, 1961.)

6. Amends Chapter II, Section 68, pertaining to the ten-year limit on proposing amendments to the constitution. (Rejected by the Senate, July 21, 1961.)

7. Amends Chapter II, Section 35, pertaining to times and terms of election for governor. (Withdrawn, July 21, 1961.)

8. Amends Chapter II, Section 13, pertaining to election of representatives, senators and governor. (Rejected by Senate, July 28, 1961.)

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1951: The Senate considered three amendments

1. Relating to maintaining schools by towns jointly. (Became Article 41 of the Amendments.)

2. Relating to office of profit and trust under authority of Congress. (Became Article 42 of the Amendments.)

3. Relating to the officers of the State Militia. (Became Article 43 of the Amendments.)

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1941: The Senate considered four amendments

1. Enabling the general assembly to regulate or restrict the right to bear arms. (Rejected by the Senate, March 25, 1941.)

2. Relating to election and qualification of certain officers, making the attorney general a constitutional officer. (Rejected by the Senate, March 25, 1941.)

3. Enabling the general assembly to provide by general laws for the organization and government of all municipal, charitable, educational, penal and reformatory corporations. (Rejected by the Senate, March 25, 1941.)

4. Providing for the calling of a constitutional convention. (Rejected by the Senate, March 25, 1941.)

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1931: The Senate considered seven amendments

1. Relating to a tax on incomes. (Rejected by the Senate, March 26, 1931.)

2. Enabling a governor to veto specific items in an appropriation bill without withholding his assent from the entire bill. (Rejected by the Senate, March 24, 1931.)

3. Providing for the election of members of the house for a four-year term. (Rejected by the Senate, March 24, 1931.)

4. Relating to election of members of the house to conform with Proposal 3. (Rejected by the Senate, March 24, 1931.)

5. Providing for apportionment of all officers of the militia by the governor. (Concurrence refused by the Senate, January 26, 1933.)

6. Relating to outdoor advertising. (Rejected by the Senate, March 24, 1931.)

7. Relating to duties of justices of the Supreme Court regarding revision of the constitution. (Concurrence of the Senate refused, January 26, 1933.)

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1921: The Senate considered twenty-one amendments

1. Extending to women the privileges and duties of suffrage. (Became Article 37 of the Amendments.)

2. Relating to item veto and proceedings thereon. (Concurrence refused by House, March 25, 1921.)

3. Enables the General Assembly to enact laws regulating the mode of filling vacancies in the House of Representatives. (Became Article 38 of the Amendments.)

4. Relating to jury trials, excluding cases requiring an accounting with numerous items. (Rejected by the Senate, February 3, 1921.)

5. Permits a person accused of a crime not punishable by death or imprisonment in the state prison to waive his right to a jury trial. (Became Article 39 of the Amendments.)

6. Relating to recording of deeds and conveyances of land, empowering the legislature to enact laws to provide for recording such instruments. (Concurrence refused by House, March 4, 1921.)

7. Changing the session of the general assembly to the first Wednesday next after the first Monday in October, beginning in 1924; changing the date of election of state and county officers, senators and town representatives to the first Tuesday in September beginning in 1924; and changing the beginning of the term of office of senators and town representatives from January to October and of county officers from February to December, following their election. (Rejected by Senate, February 3, 1921.)

8. Creating a commission to have supervision over certain public utilities. (Rejected by the Senate, February 1, 1921.)

9. Empowering the general assembly to provide for compulsory voting at election. (Rejected by Senate, February 1, 1921.)

10. Relating to amending the constitution of the state, enabling the senate to propose amendments at any session. (Rejected by Senate, February 4, 1921.)

11. Relating to the biennial election of state and certain county officers.  Repeals provision for election of assistant judges of the county court. (Rejected by Senate, February 3, 1921.)

12. Relating to senatorial districts, providing for apportionment according to population. (Rejected by the Senate, February 1, 1921.)

13. Relating to the number of representatives in the legislature and an apportionment thereof according to population. (Rejected by the Senate, February 3, 1921.)

14. Relating to the term of senators and representatives, providing that the terms of office shall be respectively two years and six years. (Rejected by the Senate, February 3, 1921.)

15. Providing for the quadrennial election of certain state officers. (Rejected by the Senate, February 4, 1921.)

16. Making the term of office of senators four years and arranging their tenure so that one half shall go out of office every two years. (Rejected by the Senate, February 4, 1921.)

17. Relating to the qualifications of freemen, requiring that a new voter under fifty years of age shall be able to read the constitution and write his name, unless prevented by physical disability. (Rejected by the Senate, February 10, 1921.)

18. Amends the declaration of rights so that men and women are placed on the same footing as to the age when they can be held to servitude or as apprentices without their consent. (Became Article 40 of the Amendments.)

19. Limiting special sessions of the legislature to the particular purposes for which such session is convened. (Concurrence of the House refused March 25, 1921.)

20. Relating to the powers of the governor to remit fines and grant pardons for certain offenses, and creating a pardoning board to consider all applications for pardons in cases of conviction of felony. (Rejected by the Senate, March 29, 1921.)

22 (21).  Relating to the governor and executive powers. (Concurrence refused by the House, March 31, 1921.)

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1910: The Senate considered fifteen amendments

1. Enabling the senate to propose constitutional amendments at any session. (Rejected by Senate, December 7, 1910.)

2. Relating to approving, signing or vetoing of bills. (Became Article 29 of the Amendments.)

3. Relating to biennial session and elections, and term of office of governor, state officers and county officers. (Became Article 30 of the Amendments.)

4. Relating to the printing of the journals, and the calling for the yeas and nays. (Became Article 31 of the Amendments.)

5. Relating to the powers of the legislature and the governor, respecting commutation, remission or mitigation of sentences. (Became Article 32 of the Amendments.)

6. Relating to the ineligibility of senators or representatives to any office of profit, the election of which is vested in the general assembly, or to such office which shall have been created or the emoluments of which shall have been increased during their terms. (Concurrence refused by the Senate, December 10, 1912.)

7. Relating to the grant, extension, change or amendment of charters. (Became Article 33 of the Amendments.)

8. Relating to the change of the words "judge" or "judges" to "justice" or "justices", where the same are used in the constitution or amendments to designate a judge or the justices of the supreme court. (Became Article 34 of the Amendments.)

9. Relating to the power of the general assembly to pass laws compelling compensation for injuries. (Became Article 35 of the Amendments.)

10. Relating to the revision of Chapter II of the Constitution. (Became Article 36 of the Amendments.)

11. Relating to taking private property for the public benefit—changing the words "uses"  and "use" in article 1 of chapter 1, to "benefits" and "benefit," respectively. (Reported as a part of Proposal 13).

12. Relating to the election of judges of the supreme court. (Decennial election, term ten years.) (Rejected by Senate, January 27, 1911.)

13. Relating to taking private property for the public benefit—embodying proposal eleven, and amending article 9 of chapter I by adding the words "or benefits" after the words "public uses." (Rejected by the Senate, January 18, 1913.)

14. Enabling the senate to propose constitutional amendments at every sixth session, commencing in 1916. (Rejected January 18, 1913.)

15. "The right of any person to vote shall not be abridged by reason of sex." (Rejected by Senate, January 27, 1911.)

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1900: The Senate considered four amendments

1. Changing the date of election of state and county officers to the Tuesday next after the first Monday in November, commencing with 1906; and changing the session of the general assembly to the first Wednesday after the first Tuesday in January, commencing with 1907. (Rejected by Senate, November 26, 1900.)

2. Enabling the Senate to propose constitutional amendments at any session. (Rejected by Senate, November 26, 1900.)

3. Apportioning senators according to population. (Rejected by Senate, November 26, 1900.)

4. Providing for filling vacancies in the senate and house of representatives. (No action taken by General Assembly of 1902.)

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1890: The Senate considered nine amendments:

1. Changing date of election of state and county officers to the Tuesday next after the first Monday of November and changing the date of the biennial sessions to the first Wednesday of January. (Rejected by Senate, November 21, 1890.)

2. Providing that courts of justice shall consist of a supreme court, county courts and courts of chancery and such inferior courts as the legislature has established or may from time to time establish; that the supreme court shall consist of a chief judge and three associate judges, to be appointed by the governor by and with the advice of the senate; that the county court and court of chancery in each county shall consist of a single judge, and that the number of such judges shall be six, to be appointed by the governor, by and with the advice and consent of the senate; that the judges of the supreme court shall be appointed for the term of eight years and the tenure so regulated that one judge shall go out of office every two years; and that the term of the county judges shall be six years and their tenure so regulated that two shall go out of office every two years. (Rejected by the Senate, November 21, 1890.)

3. Forbidding the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors. (Rejected by the Senate, November 24, 1890.)

4. Enabling the senate to propose constitutional amendments at any session. (Rejected by Senate, November 22, 1890.)

5. Apportioning senators according to population. (Rejected by Senate, November 24, 1890.)

6. Establishing judicial circuits for the supreme court, of not more than four counties each. (Concurrence refused by House, November 25, 1890.)

7. Making the term of office of senators and representatives four years, and arranging their tenure so that one-half shall go out of office each two years. (Rejected by Senate, November 25, 1890.)

8. Apportioning representatives to districts consisting of at least five hundred inhabitants each. (Rejected by Senate, November 22, 1890.)

9. Making members of the legislature ineligible to election by the legislature to any executive or judicial office. (No action by House, 1890.)

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1880: The Senate considered twenty-three amendments

1. Changing the time of holding freemen's meeting to the first Tuesday next after the first Monday in November (commencing in 1886), and the time of sessions of the General Assembly to the first Wednesday in January (commencing in 1887). (Rejected by House, December 22, 1880.)

2. Fixing the number of representatives at one hundred fifty, apportioned among the counties according to population. (Rejected by House, December 22, 1880.)

3. Forbidding legislation enabling towns to aid railroads. (Rejected by Senate, November 25, 1882.)

4. Changing the time of elections, and sessions of the general assembly, from biennially to annually. (Rejected by Senate, December 22, 1880.)

5. Making members of the legislature ineligible to be elected by the legislature to any executive or judiciary office. (Rejected by Senate, December 22, 1880.)

6. Empowering the governor to order an election to fill a vacancy in the Senate or House. (Rejected by Senate, November 25, 1882.)

7. Enabling Legislature to prohibit sale of intoxicating liquors, but not to license the traffic in intoxicating drinks. (No action, see Proposal 23.)

8. Repealing such amendments as require the election of assistant judges of the county court. (Rejected by the Senate, December 22, 1880.)

9. Relating to trials by jury in proper cases, where the value in controversy does not exceed one hundred dollars, and the title of real estate is not concerned. (Rejected by the Senate, December 22, 1880.)

10. Empowering the governor, the senate, or the house to require the opinions of the judges of the supreme court. (Rejected by House, December 22, 1880.)

11. Enabling constitutional amendments to be proposed at each biennial session, commencing in 1884. (Rejected by Senate, December 8, 1880.)

12. Limiting municipal indebtedness. (Amended, December 22, 1880.) (Rejected by Senate, December 22, 1880.)

13. Relating to returning and canvassing votes of state officers, in substitution for Section 10 of Chapter 2 (Amended, December 16, 1880.) (Rejected by House, December 23, 1880.)

14. Empowering the governor to veto certain items in appropriations bills. (Rejected by Senate, December 22, 1880.)

15. Empowering the legislature to establish one supreme court for the state, and to regulate the terms and places of sessions. (Rejected by Senate, December 22, 1880.)

16. Empowering the legislature to abolish or prescribe the duties of the grand jury. (Rejected by Senate, December 22, 1880.)

17. Relating to the powers of the governor respecting reprieves, commutations, and pardons, and creating an advisory board. (Rejected by House, November 21, 1882.)

18. Making special charters subject to right of future Legislatures to alter, amend, or repeal as public good requires. (Died in House, 1880.)

19. Requiring additional oath of members of general assembly, concerning Federal offices of profit or trust, and defining such offices. (Became Article 27 of the Amendments.)

20. Providing for election of secretary of state and auditor of accounts upon same ticket as governor, etc. (Became Article 28 of the Amendments.)

21. Relating to future proposals of amendment to the constitution. (Rejected by Senate, December 20, 1880.)

22. Enabling the general assembly to propose constitutional amendments every fourth year, commencing with 1884. (Rejected by House, December 23, 1880.)

23. Prohibiting manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors. (Rejected by House, November 21, 1882.)

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Proposals by the Council of Censors, 1785-1870

1869-70: The Thirteenth Council of Censors proposed seven articles of amendment. The Convention of 1870 adopted three of these, including legislative proposal and popular ratification of amendments (including abolishment of the Council of Censors), biennial elections and sessions, and biennial terms for the Supreme Court.

1862: The Twelfth Council of Censors proposed no amendments to the Constitution.

1855-56: The Eleventh Council of Censors proposed nineteen articles of amendment. The Convention of 1856 adopted none of the proposals.

1848-49: The Tenth Council of Censors proposed fifteen articles of amendment, of which the Convention of 1850 adopted ten.

1841-42: The Ninth Council of Censors proposed ten articles of amendment. All were rejected by the Convention of 1843.

1834-35: The Eighth Council of Censors proposed twenty articles of amendment to the Vermont Constitution. The Convention of 1836 adopted twelve of the proposals, including the Vermont Senate, the abolishment of the Executive Council, non-suspension of habeas corpus, and the veto power of the Governor.

1827-28: The Seventh Council of Censors proposed three articles of amendment. Article III, relating to naturalization, adopted by the Convention of 1828 on June 26, was the first amendment to the Vermont Constitution since 1793.

1821-22: The Sixth Council of Censors proposed five articles of amendment, none of them adopted by the Convention of 1814.

1813: The Fifth Council of Censors proposed twenty-eight articles of amendment, none of them adopted by the Convention of 1814.

1806: The Fourth Council of Censors made no proposals of amendment.

1799: The Third Council of Censors made no proposals of amendment.

1792-93: The Second Council of Censors proposed amendments to the 1786 Constitution.  The Constitution of 1793 was adopted in Convention, July 3-July 9, 1793, at Windsor.

1785-86: The First Council of Censors proposed amendments to the Constitution of 1777.  The Constitution of 1786 was adopted in Convention, June, 1786, at Manchester, with the order of Convention signed by Moses Robinson, July 4, 1786.

1777: The Constitution of 1777 was adopted in Convention, July 2-July 8 and December 24, 1777, at Windsor.

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This page was last updated: 2016-12-01